Nightmare in Suburbia - Netflix

Sun 21 April 2019

Filed under netflix

Tags netflix Documentary English

Nightmare in Suburbia is the shocking series that peers behind the lace curtains of suburban Britain to expose its dark, sinful and murderous underbelly. Come with us as we reveal that criminality is not only confined to big cities. In fact some of the most gruesome and unexpected crimes in the UK's recent history have taken place amongst the most unsuspecting and apparently innocent of communities.

Nightmare in Suburbia - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 50 minutes

Premier: 2014-09-30

Nightmare in Suburbia - James Howard Kunstler - Netflix

James Howard Kunstler (born October 19, 1948) is an American author, social critic, public speaker, and blogger. He is best known for his books The Geography of Nowhere (1994), a history of American suburbia and urban development, The Long Emergency (2005), and most recently, Too Much Magic (2012). In The Long Emergency, he argues that declining oil production is likely to result in the end of industrialized society as we know it and force Americans to live in smaller-scale, localized, agrarian (or semi-agrarian) communities. Starting with World Made by Hand in 2008, Kunstler has written a series of science fiction novels about such a culture in the future. Kunstler gives lectures on topics related to suburbia, urban development, and the challenges of what he calls “the global oil predicament”, and a resultant change in the “American Way of Life.” He has lectured at the TED Conference, the American Institute of Architects, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the International Council of Shopping Centers, the National Association of Science and Technology, as well as at numerous colleges and universities, including Yale, MIT, Harvard, Cornell, University of Illinois, DePaul, Texas A & M, the USMA, and Rutgers University. As a journalist, Kunstler continues to write for The Atlantic Monthly, Slate.com, RollingStone, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, and its op-ed page where he often covers environmental and economic issues. Kunstler is also a leading supporter of the movement known as “New Urbanism.”

Nightmare in Suburbia - Writing - Netflix

Over the course of the first 14 years of his writing career (1979–1993), Kunstler wrote seven novels. Since the mid-1990s, he has written four non-fiction books about suburban development and diminishing global oil supplies. According to the Columbia Journalism Review, his first work on the subject, The Geography of Nowhere, discussed the effects of “cartoon architecture, junked cities, and a ravaged countryside”. The book was described as a jeremiad by The Washington Post. Kunstler is critical of suburbia and urban development trends throughout the United States, and is a proponent of the New Urbanism movement. According to Scott Carlson, reporter for The Chronicle of Higher Education, Kunstler's books on the subject have become “standard reading in architecture and urban planning courses”. He describes America as a poorly planned and “tragic landscape of highway strips, parking lots, housing tracts, mega-malls, junked cities, and ravaged countryside that makes up the everyday environment where most Americans live and work.” In a 2001 op-ed for Planetizen, he wrote that in the wake of 9/11 the “age of skyscrapers is at an end”, that no new megatowers would be built, and that existing tall buildings are destined to be dismantled. In his books that followed, such as Home From Nowhere, The City in Mind, and The Long Emergency (2005), he discussed topics like a post-oil America. Kunstler says he wrote The Geography of Nowhere, “Because I believe a lot of people share my feelings about the tragic landscape of highway strips, parking lots, housing tracts, mega-malls, junked cities, and ravaged countryside that makes up the everyday environment where most Americans live and work”. He was featured in the “peak oil” documentary, The End of Suburbia, widely circulated on the internet, as well as the Canadian mockumentary, Radiant City (2006). In his recent science fiction novel World Made by Hand (2008), he describes a future dependent on localized production and agriculture, with little reliance on imports. Three “World Made by Hand” sequels have followed: The Witch of Hebron (2010), A History of the Future (2015), and The Harrows of Spring (scheduled for release in July 2016). In his writings and lectures, he contends that there is no other alternative energy source on the horizon that can replace relatively cheap oil. He therefore envisions a “low energy” world that will be radically different from today's. This has contributed to his becoming an outspoken advocate for one of his solutions, a more energy-efficient rail system, and writes “we have to get cracking on the revival of the railroad system if we expect to remain a united country.”

Nightmare in Suburbia - References - Netflix


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